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Dellwood Program Center

School Field Trips

Camp Dellwood - A hidden gem in the city to explore STEM and Outdoor Education

Just minutes away from the noise of the city, Camp Dellwood will make you feel miles away from anywhere! With over 100 acres of woods, the camp offers plenty of room to explore and have outdoor fun while blending the benefits of outdoor education and inquiry-based STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) education while meeting Indiana’s Academic Standards, as well as, allow students the chance to learn science first-hand.

Lessons incorporate curriculum goals and integrate hands-on field experiences within the 100 acres of camp. All programs serve as an excellent means to introduce and reinforce topics in a dynamic and enriching way. Experienced educators and volunteers lead the field trips.

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Field Trip Costs

Guided Field Trip Programs:
Guided Field Trip Student Cost for 1 Program Option - $5 per child
Guided Field Trip Student Cost for 2 Program Options - $7 per child
Teachers and Chaperones Cost for Guided Field Trips – Free
Bus Parking - Free

Self-Guided Exploratory Programs:
All Camp Access (minus the Math and Science Center) - $100 for entire group
Program Center and trail/grass access - $50 for entire group
Bus Parking - Free

Up to 90 students can be served on a field trip day. Your group will be split into smaller groups upon arrival to ensure students receive the best program possible.

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What is the best time to schedule our field trip?

Self-guided exploratory programs are available Monday-Friday 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Guided field trip programs are available Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursdays only.
Fall (September-October) and Spring (April-May) are the best times of year to schedule these due to weather. Most of your activities will take place outside.
 

Booking Information

To schedule a field trip, use our online request form . The schedule opens in late August for field trips in September through May. Scheduling several months in advance is highly recommended. When completing the form, please be prepared with:
· Program Topic
· Approximate number of students and adults
· Grade/age of students
· Program date, time, and at least one alternative
Don’t see a topic that works for your needs? Additional topics and programs are available and can be tailored to fit the goals of your group.  Jory Sejdiu, school program specialist is excited to work with you to plan the perfect day for your group. 
 

Home School Day

Girl Scouts of Central Indiana is excited to host a day for home school students!

April 8, 2019  - Register

September 3, 2019  - Register

· $5 person
· Enjoy a day at the camp with other home school groups in the area! Must be scheduled in advance. Your group will be able to self-explore the camp and have access to STEM and outdoor education led activities. Spring and Fall hours are 10 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
 

Chaperone Requirements
Grade Level Number of Students Number of Chaperones
Pre K - Grade 2 5 1
Grades 3-6 10 1

Please do not bring babies or tagalongs unless prior arrangements have been made with our staff. Chaperones are asked to handle any disciplinary actions with their group and participate by providing additional hands during activities. Since we are at camp, we encourage all cell phones and electronic devices to be put away during the activities.

Important Information to Know Before Scheduling Your Field Trip
  • 50% deposit is due at time of reservation if your school is not sponsored by a school district.
  • Full payment is due one (1) week prior to Field Trip. An Invoice will be sent to the email provided.
  • We accept payment by credit card over the phone, check, or purchase order. (Please NO siblings). Please estimate as close as possible.
  • Must be scheduled 2 weeks in advance.
  • Available September-May
  • Cancelations or changes to your reservation must be made at least one week prior to your scheduled field trip. Cancelations with less than one-week notice will be charged half of the expected program fee. 
  • Staff will notify teachers the morning of the program if it must be canceled due to inclement weather.
  • No Call/No Show: Results in a forfeiture of all monies. We take a loss when this occurs.
  • Field Trips start at the designated times. We are unable to extend the time of a field trip in the event of a late arrival.
  • Field Trip Includes: 1. 5 hour presentation with a hands on experience, according to field trip chosen, place to eat lunch, ability to explore the camp on your own, a 10 minute Girl Scout meet and greet to talk about the Girl Scout experience.
  • Liability/Responsibility: Please be advised: teachers, parents, or designated guardians need to be responsible for children at all during the guided field trips.
  • If the weather does not permit your scheduled activity to take place, Girl Scouts of Central Indiana will try their best to accommodate a similar activity and/or to choose an activity that best fits the age level of the attendees.
     
Lunch

Each school group is responsible for providing their own lunch. It is encouraged to have brown bag lunches as refrigeration will not be available. All groups are responsible for cleaning up their lunch areas and leaving the environment around them cleaner than they found it.

What to Wear

Wear comfortable clothing and tennis shoes. There will be a lot of walking around camp, and it’s important to wear clothing that can get dirty. Be sure that everyone is dressed for the weather. If rain is predicted, ponchos are encouraged.

Program Opportunities for Guided Field Trip Option

Girl Scouts of Central Indiana has several program options for you to choose from. A list of those programs and descriptions are:
STEM Year Round
Amazing Air
Grades 3, 4, 5
We know that we need air to survive but what else can air do? We will make sound, make objects move, mix water with air to see what we get, and much more. Come and find out all about air!

Third Grade 3.PS.3 Generate sound energy using a variety of materials and techniques, and recognize that it passes through solids, liquids, and gases (i.e. air).
Fourth Grade4.PS.1 Investigate transportation systems and devices that operate on or in land, water, air, space, and recognize the forces (lift, drag, friction, thrust and gravity) that affect their motion.
Will use Fifth Grade SEPS.3 Constructing and performing investigations

Ewey Gooey Science
Grades 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
That is right ewey gooey science! Students will be making bubbling potions, slimy goo, and some gross, yet fun experiments! Come see how ewey gooey this science lab can be!

First Grade 1.PS.1 Characterize materials as solid, liquid, or gas and investigate their properties, record observations and explain the choices to others based on evidence (i.e., physical properties).
Second Grade 2.PS.2 Predict the result of combining solids and liquids in pairs. Mix, observe, gather, record, and discuss evidence of whether the result may have different properties than the original materials.
Third Grade 3.PS.3 Generate sound energy using a variety of materials and techniques, and recognize that it passes through solids, liquids, and gases (i.e. air).
Fourth Grade SEPS.3 Constructing and performing investigations
Fifth Grade 5.PS.1 Describe and measure the volume and mass of a sample of a given material.

Meet Goldie Engineering Badge Cars
Grades K, 1, 2, 3
Design, build, test and race in this program. Students will work with our Goldie Blox kits as we see just how design can affect a cars speed. See you at the finish line.

K-2.E.2 Develop a simple sketch, drawing, or physical model to illustrate and investigate how the shape of an object helps it function as needed to solve an identified problem.
K-2.E.1 Pose questions, make observations, and obtain information about a situation people want to change. Use this data to define a simple problem that can be solved through the construction of a new or improved object or tool.
Third Grade 3.PS.2 Identify types of simple machines and their uses. Investigate and build simple machines to understand how they are used.

Mystery Festival Detective Badge
Grades 4, 5
What happen to Felix Navidad the Millionaire? The class with become a Forensic Scientist they try to solve the case of the Missing Millionaire. Students will work with fingerprints, Ph testing, fiber analyses, and much more as they work to solve the case.

SEPS.7 Engaging in argument from evidence
SEPS.8 Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information

Robots Designing
Grades 2,3,4,5
Want your students to build their very own robot? Students will learn about circuits, then design and tinker with their own bot. Spark their creativity as we build bristle bots.

Second Grade K-2.E.2 Develop a simple sketch, drawing, or physical model to illustrate and investigate how the shape of an object helps it function as needed to solve an identified problem.
Third, Fourth and Fifth Grade 3-5.E.3 Construct and perform fair investigations in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.
Third, Fourth and Fifth Grade 3-5.E.1 Identify a simple problem with the design of an object that reflects a need or a want. Include criteria for success and constraints on materials, time, or cost.

Robots Programming
Grades 2,3,4,5
Robots are simple machines that are programmed to run automatically. Students will become a programmer as they try their hand at programming our Lego robots. They will be programming how the robots move and turn!

Second Grade K-2.E.3 Analyze data from the investigation of two objects constructed to solve the same problem to compare the strengths and weaknesses of how each performs.
Second Grade K-2.PA.3 Arrange information using concept mapping tools and a set of statements that accomplish a simple task.
Third, Fourth, Fifth Grade 3-5.CD.4 Recognize that computers model intelligent behavior (as found in robotics, speech and language recognition, and computer animation).

Science of Color
Grades K, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
The class will become a colorologist as we combine the exciting world of chemistry and color! We will be experimenting with color mixing, chemical reactions, and art. Rainbows may be amazing in the sky but you should see them in the lab! Students will see just how Science and Art blends.

Kindergarten K.PS.1 Plan and conduct an investigation using all senses to describe and classify different kinds of objects by their composition and physical properties. Explain these choices to others and generate questions about the objects.
First Grade 1.PS.2 Predict and experiment with methods (sieving, evaporation) to separate solids and liquids based on their physical properties.
Second Grade 2.PS.2 Predict the result of combining solids and liquids in pairs. Mix, observe, gather, record, and discuss evidence of whether the result may have different properties than the original materials.
Third Grade 3.PS.1 Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence of the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object.
Fourth and Fifth Grades will use SEPS.1 Posing questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering)

Seasonal STEM Programs

Bubble Fest (call for December times and call for dates in February)
Grades Pr K, K, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
We are bubbling over with math and science! Students will stand inside a huge bubble, make big bubbles to measure, use different instruments to create bubbles, discover "walls" of bubbles, and more!

Kindergarten K.M.1: Make direct comparisons of the length, capacity, weight, and temperature of objects, and recognize which object is shorter, longer, taller, lighter, heavier, warmer, cooler, or holds more.
First Grade 1.M.1: Use direct comparison or a nonstandard unit to compare and order objects according to length, area, capacity, weight, and temperature.
Second Grade 2.M.2: Estimate and measure the length of an object by selecting and using appropriate tools, such as rulers, yardsticks, meter sticks, and measuring tapes to the nearest inch, foot, yard, centimeter and meter.
Third Grade 3.M.2: Choose and use appropriate units and tools to estimate and measure length, weight, and temperature. Estimate and measure length to a quarter-inch, weight in pounds, and temperature in degrees Celsius and Fahrenheit.
Fourth Grade 4.M.1: Measure length to the nearest quarter-inch, eighth-inch, and millimeter.

Butterfly Science (Dates in September and dates in April and May)
Grades 2,3,4,5
Come and investigate the world of a butterfly. Learn the fascinating facts about butterflies while you explore the Math and Science Center’s Butterfly Garden. We will be able to see exactly what plants butterflies like the best. Join us for a scientific look into the world of a butterfly!

Second Grade 2.LS.2 Compare and contrast details of body plans and structures within the life cycles of plants and animals.
Third Grade 3.LS.3 Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.
Fourth Grade 4.LS.2 Use evidence to support the explanation that a change in the environment may result in a plant or animal will survive and reproduce, move to a new location, or die.
Fifth Grade 5.LS.2 Observe and classify common Indiana organisms as producers, consumers, decomposers, or predator and prey based on their relationships and interactions with other organisms in their ecosystem.

Environmental Education

Sensory Awareness
Grades Pr K, 1, 2, 3
Students will use all of their senses as they explore the trails of Camp Dellwood. Engage in the outside world of plants, animals and how we fit in.

Second Grade 2.LS.2 Compare and contrast details of body plans and structures within the life cycles of plants and animals.
Third Grade 3.LS.2 Plan and conduct an investigation to determine the basic needs of plants to grow, develop
Third Grade 3.LS.3 Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior and reproduction
Complements Life Science standards: K: observe and compare animals 1st: classify animals, animal interdependence

o Early Learning Foundation – SC3.1 - Identify living organisms by name; Name characteristics of living organisms; Identify the correct names for adult and baby animals Compare attributes of living organisms; Differentiate animals from plants Discriminate between living organisms and non-living objects Ask questions and conduct investigations to understand life science
o K.LS.1 – Describe and compare the growth and development of common living plants and animals.
o K.LS.2 - Describe and compare the physical features of common living plants and animals.
o K.LS.3 - Use observations to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive.
o 1.LS.3 - Make observations of plants and animals to compare the diversity of life in different habitats.
o 1.LS.4 - Use a model to represent the relationship between the needs of different plants and animals (including humans) and the places they live.
o 2.LS.2. – Compare and contrast details of body plans and structures within the life cycles of plants and animals.
 

Habitats in the Woods
Grades K, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6,
Animals adapt to the environment they live in and their need for survival. Students will explore our woods to learn about these changes while investigating what they need in their habitats.
Complements Life Science standards: K: observe and compare animals, 1st: basic needs of animals in habitats, diversity. 2nd: classify animals, determine animal’s needs. 3rd: animal survival and adaptation.

o K.LS.1 – Describe and compare the growth and development of common living plants and animals.
o K.LS.2 – Describe and compare the physical features of common living plants and animals.
o K.LS.3 – Use observations to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive.
o 1.LS.2 - Develop a model mimicking how plants and/or animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs. Explore how those external parts could solve a human problem.
o 1.LS.3 - Make observations of plants and animals to compare the diversity of life in different habitats.
o 1.LS.4 – Use a model to represent the relationship between the needs of different plants and animals (including humans) and the places they live.
o 2.LS.3 – Classify living organisms according to variations in specific physical features (i.e. body coverings, appendages) and describe how those features may provide an advantage for survival in different environments.
o 3.LS.1 – Analyze evidence that plants and animals have traits inherited from parents and that variation of these traits exists in a group of similar organisms.
o 3.LS.2 – Plan and conduct an investigation to determine the basic needs of plants to grow, develop, and reproduce.
o 3.LS.4 – Construct an argument that some animals form groups that help members survive.

Birds in your Backyard
Grades K, 1
We will learn about the lifecycle of the birds in our camp while hiking the trails of camp.

Complements Life Science standards: K: observe and compare animals, 1st: basic needs of animals in habitats, diversity.

o K.LS.1 – Describe and compare the growth and development of common living plants and animals.
o K.LS.2 – Describe and compare the physical features of common living plants and animals.
o 1.LS.1 – Develop representations to describe that organisms have unique and diverse life cycles but all have in common birth, growth, reproduction, and death.
o 1.LS.2 – Develop a model mimicking how plants and/or animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs. Explore how those external parts could solve a human problem.
o 2.LS.1 – Determine patterns and behavior (adaptations) of parents and offspring which help offspring to survive.
o 2.LS.2 – Compare and contrast details of body plans and structures within the life cycles of plants and animals.
o 3.LS.1 - Analyze evidence that plants and animals have traits inherited from parents and that variation of these traits exists in a group of similar organisms.
o 3.LS.3 - Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction
 

 

Woodland Ecosystems
Grades 4, 5, 6,
Students will explore our woods learning about our ecosystem while hiking and playing games.

o 4.LS.1 - Observe, analyze, and interpret how offspring are very much, but not exactly, like their parents or one another. Describe how these differences in physical characteristics among individuals in a population may be advantageous for survival and reproduction.
o 4.LS.2 - Use evidence to support the explanation that a change in the environment may result in a plant or animal will survive and reproduce, move to a new location, or die.
o 5.LS.1 - Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.
o 5.LS.2 - Observe and classify common Indiana organisms as producers, consumers, decomposers, or predator and prey based on their relationships and interactions with other organisms in their ecosystem.
o 5.ESS.3 - Investigate ways individual communities within the United States protect the Earth’s resources and environment.
o 6.LS.2 - Describe the role of photosynthesis in the flow of energy in food chains, energy pyramids, and food webs. Create diagrams to show how the energy in animals' food used for bodily processes was once energy from the sun.
o 6.LS.3 – Describe specific relationships (predator/prey, consumer/producer, parasite/host) and symbiotic relationships between organisms. Construct an explanation that predicts why patterns of interactions develop between organisms in an ecosystem.
o 6.LS.4 - Investigate and use data to explain how changes in biotic and abiotic components in a given habitat can be beneficial or detrimental to native plants and animals.
o 6.LS.5 - Research invasive species and discuss their impact on ecosystems.

Ecology of Woods
Grades 4, 5, 6
Students will explore our woods learning about the trees, plants and animals who live here at Camp Dellwood. Take a hike, identify common Indiana trees and plants while playing games to become one with the natural world.

o 4.LS.1 - Observe, analyze, and interpret how offspring are very much, but not exactly, like their parents or one another. Describe how these differences in physical characteristics among individuals in a population may be advantageous for survival and reproduction.
o 4.LS.2 - Use evidence to support the explanation that a change in the environment may result in a plant or animal will survive and reproduce, move to a new location, or die.
o 4.LS.3 - Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction in a different ecosystems.
o 5.LS.2 - Observe and classify common Indiana organisms as producers, consumers, decomposers, or predator and prey based on their relationships and interactions with other organisms in their ecosystem.
o 5.LS.3 - Use a model to describe that animals receive different types of information through their senses, process the information in their brain, and respond to the information in different ways.
o 5.ESS.3 - Investigate ways individual communities within the United States protect the Earth’s resources and environment.
o 6.LS.1 – Investigate and describe how homeostasis is maintained as living things seek out their basic needs of food, water, shelter, space, and air.
o 6.LS.3 – Describe specific relationships (predator/prey, consumer/producer, parasite/host) and symbiotic relationships between organisms. Construct an explanation that predicts why patterns of interactions develop between organisms in an ecosystem.

Compass Games
Grades 5, 6
Students will learn compass games for fun and to help with mathematical understandings.

IN standards: 5.2.7, 5.4.1, 6.4.4
 

Additional Self-Guided Exploratory Option Information

COMING SOON
We offer a self-exploration option. This must be scheduled in advance. The group will be able to self-explore the camp and have access to the exploratory kits (each kit will serve 30 students) listed below:
Compass and Orienteering            Nature Bingo             Alphabet Hike
Color Hike                   Team Building Kit

 

Student/Chaperone Ratio for Self-Exploration:

Grade Level Number of Students Number of Chaperones
Pre K- Grade 2 5 1
Grades 3-6 10 1
What activities are available in our free time?

Groups are invited to spend the day at camp, there is plenty to do and all within walking distance.

Hike the nature trails                          Explore the cemetery         
Play games in the grassy fields         Picnic in the camp       
Spend time on the fitness trail          Discover wildlife by the creek bed

 

Please contact our school program specialist Jory Sejdiu for information and additional specifics about these exciting programs.

For additional information, contact Mandy Montgomery, property and camp administrator at 317.924.6827.

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